Young minds push auto design limits

Students from the prestigious UMEA Institute of Design in Sweden and the Northern Works design agency in Finland recently joined the Covestro team in a project called “Magic: Revealed.”

Students from the prestigious UMEA Institute of Design in Sweden and the Northern Works design agency in Finland recently joined the Covestro team in a project called “Magic: Revealed.” The project aimed to inspire students to push the limits between aesthetics and materials. Covestro invited them to develop new ideas for design and functionality to fulfill the changing needs, expectations and dreams of future drivers.

Students’ designs focused on transparent and translucent grades of Makrolon® polycarbonate and novel daytime and nighttime lighting applications. The students reflected a clear understanding of the creative possibilities polycarbonate offers to future automotive designs and applications.

“The best student concepts even have what it takes to serve as demos at trade shows,” said Jochen Hardt, head of global marketing automotive and transportation, Covestro.

From all the designs, Covestro selected six different concepts and invited these students to the Polycarbonate Technical Service Center in Leverkusen. They were introduced to polycarbonate materials and learned about various processing options. Using 3D and 2D renderings, posters, high-resolution photos and mood boards, students channeled their creativity to build something new and demonstrate an understanding of the versatility of plastics in automotive design.

“[The students] did a great job proposing a wide range of ideas covering both functional and aesthetic properties on their concepts,” said Demian Horst, UMEA Institute of Design. “For us, one of the most important aspects was that their creative process involved interaction with the engineering and marketing team from Covestro. Industrial design is a multi-disciplinary effort and this project proved a great platform to teach that to these students.”

To visualize their ideas, the students used 3D and 2D renderings, posters and high-resolution photos, as well as mood boards, which are arrangements of visual elements that project the concept and emotional aspects of a design, while underlining the attractiveness of plastics.

In return, the project offered the students a welcome opportunity to gain practical insight into the work of a leading materials company. Two of the students will complete internships at Covestro this summer.

For more information email plastics@covestro.com.

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